With so many advantages, it is no wonder apprenticeships are rising in popularity than ever before. For a lot of would-be apprentices, the prospect of paid coaching, the power to earn a living wage when you study, and many job prospects out of the gate sounds lots higher than paying an ordinary of $36,500 for a four-year degree at a state faculty or much more at a personal college.

With that being said, some apprenticeships are a better bet than others, with many experiencing higher levels of demand than ordinary. Using data from the U.S. Department of Labor and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we created this list of top jobs that begin with an apprenticeship:

Elevator Installers and Repairers

Using years of data and expertise, these workers repair broken elevators, perform basic and routine elevator maintenance, and work with elevator cables, motors, doors, and management systems. Since elevator repair is such a selected skill, it’s most typically learned through hands-on coaching beneath a professional elevator installer and repairer. More often than not, that coaching features a 5-year apprenticeship that gives 144 hours of related technical instruction and 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job coaching.

  • Education required: 5-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 25%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $76,490
  • Top-paying states: Oregon ($101,920), Maine ($99,640), Hawaii ($92,980)

Pile-Driver Operators

Just like other workers in construction, pile-driver operators use heavy gear to move and transport giant objects. Specifically, they use machines mounted onto skids, barges, or cranes to force heavy beams used for building foundations, piers, or bridges into the bottom.

Since learning the ropes takes time and many hands-on expertise, most people begin this career with a 3- or four-year apprenticeship. These programs can vary, however they often involve a mixture of classroom and technical instruction and on-the-job coaching.

  • Education required: Three- or four-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 28%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $56,200
  • Top-paying states: New York ($76,000), Massachusetts ($71,190), California ($70,120)

Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters

Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install various pipes and fixtures that carry liquids and gases out and in of buildings and houses. They study blueprints, determine which product must be put in, and perform installation of those elements to meet state and federal standards. Along with installation, additionally they complete system tests in addition to upgrades and repairs.

More often than not, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters get began with a four- or 5-year apprenticeship, which includes 1,700 to 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job coaching and 246 hours of related technical education.

  • Education required: Four- or 5-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 21%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $54,620
  • Top-paying states: Oregon ($72,440), Illinois ($71,810), Massachusetts ($71,270)

Electricians

After reading blueprints and studying their directions, electricians use their in-depth information circuits and their elements to install and maintain electrical power through using wiring, management, and lighting systems. They examine electrical elements, determine electrical issues, repair or replace wiring or equipment, and ensure everything is completed to federal and state laws.

Based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics, these workers sometimes begin their careers by completing a four- or 5-year apprenticeship program, which may include as much as 144 hours of technical coaching and 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job coaching.

  • Education required: Four- or 5-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 20%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $54,520
  • Top-paying states: Alaska ($78,800), Illinois ($69,940), New York ($69,820)

Structural Iron and Steel Workers

Iron and steel workers perform a variety of tasks that draw upon their information and expertise with iron and steel as building materials. They read blueprints, use cranes to raise steel beams, align and weld steel beams and columns, and use quite a lot of means to bend and type steel and iron. (And as you might know, they often perform this work several stories above ground — so should you’re afraid of heights, perhaps skip this one!)

Because this career requires a lot hands-on expertise, it is most typically began with a 3- or four-year apprenticeship program, which includes 144 hours of technical coaching and 2,000 jobs of paid hands-on instruction.

  • Education required: Three- or four-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 22%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $53,140
  • Top-paying states: New Jersey ($89,020), New York ($82,320), Illinois ($79,600)

Mechanical Insulation Workers

Working principally in businesses, factories, and other giant buildings, mechanical insulation workers expertly apply insulation to pipes and ductwork. Since several types of insulation are needed for various elements of every building, hands-on coaching and on-the-job expertise is a should for this career.

Based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most mechanical insulation workers complete an apprenticeship that lasts four years. Once graduated, they move on to high-paying and high-demand careers. Even higher, that is one other a type of jobs that simply can’t be shipped overseas.

  • Education required: Four-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 47%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $50,160
  • Top-paying states: Oregon ($87,590), Indiana ($83,140), Illinois ($78,320)

Brickmasons, Blockmasons, and Stonemasons

Using bricks, concrete blocks, and stones, brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons use their information and physical strength to build homes, buildings, foundations, walls, and other structures. As well as, many of those workers draw on their creativity to ascertain and build creative design parts made out of brick or stone, similar to custom outdoor fireplaces, brick porches or patios, or distinctive chimney options.

Since these trades require lots of technical skill and expertise, learning on the job is usually what works best. Though a few of these workers learn their skills at a trade or technical faculty, the overwhelming majority learn their trade through a 3- or four-year apprenticeship program.

  • Education required: Three- or four-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 36%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $50,000
  • Top-paying states: Massachusetts ($77,640), Illinois ($70,910), New York ($65,460)

Carpenters

Carpenters use wood and other materials to build everything from walls and foundations to furniture, stairwells, door frames, or rafters. They could also repair and replace damaged or rotting wooden elements of a building or structure.

Since that is such a hands-on career, many carpenters learn their trade by starting as a helper or learning on-the-job. Others, nevertheless, complete a 3- or four-year apprenticeship that features 144 hours of technical coaching and 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job coaching and labor.

  • Education required: On-the-job coaching or three- or four-year apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 24%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $45,590
  • Top-paying states: Hawaii ($66,880), Alaska ($66,150), New York ($59,460)

Solar Photovoltaic Installers

Commonly known as solar panel installers, these workers install and repair solar panel systems in homes and business settings. They map out solar installation plans, hook up the systems to the grid, and perform basic maintenance in addition to in-depth repairs.

Many begin this career with on-the-job coaching beneath the supervision of an experienced solar photovoltaic installer, while others learn their skills through occupational apprenticeship programs. While solar-specific apprenticeship programs aren’t currently obtainable, many specialists suggest they are going to be obtainable within the very close to future.

  • Education required: One-year on-the-job coaching or occupational apprenticeship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 24%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $41,770
  • Top-paying states: Hawaii ($50,740), Massachusetts ($48,920), New Jersey ($44,380)

Cement Masons and Concrete Finishers

Using a cement mixture, cement masons, concrete finishers, and terrazzo workers create ornamental and helpful concrete surfaces for on a regular basis use. They set forms to hold concrete in place, take special care to pour concrete to exacting standards, and spread and level the product before adding sealants and waterproofing.

Though there are not any specific necessities, most cement workers learn their trade by completing an internship that lasts as much as three years. In some cases, cement internships include 144 hours of classroom instruction and 2,000 hours of paid coaching.

  • Education required: Three-year internship
  • Anticipated national growth, 2012 to 2022: 29%
  • Mean annual wage in 2014: $40,970
  • Top-paying states: Hawaii ($66,230), New York ($64,620), Alaska ($58,050)

 

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